Note Cards (Choose any 5 cards)

$20.00

Choose any 5 cards for $20~available in packages of 5 cards and envelopes (Please specify image choices) Blank inside/stories on back.
Cards are 5 x 7 inches with the exception of “PEACE” (3.25 X 8 inches) and
“SANDHILL CRANE DANCE” (3.5 X 8.5 inches)
Cards are printed on Sundance felt cover stock and are sent in a clear protective bag
(Royal Sundance is Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified to come from responsibly managed forests, and made using 100% renewable energy sources and from recycled fibers from 30% to 100% post consumer waste)

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Qty Must be Between 1 and 5

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Sandhill Crane Dance

sandhill cranes
birds of the clouds
dance to earth
to share our life
and give blessings 
to the waters and the wind.

-Dawn Dark Mountain 


Native American tradition says that Sandhill Cranes once lived among the clouds.

Peace

Sky Woman (An Iroquois Creation Song)

It is said that long ago there lived among the clouds another people, called sky people. Among them grew a sacred tree, which gave off a beautiful light. Sky Woman, who was with child, fell through a hole at the roots of the sacred tree. As she fell she tried to find something to hold on to, but what came away in her hands were the sacred plants of strawberry & tobacco and a bit of earth from the roots of the tree. She fell into our world where there was only darkness with water below. The water birds saw Sky Woman fall and caught her so she would not fall into the water. It was the Great Turtle who offered his back as a place for Sky Woman. One by one, the sea animals swam down below the water in search of the sacred earth that fell with Sky Woman. It was Muskrat, finally, who was able to bring up some of the earth and spread it on Turtle’s back. Sky Woman sang and walked in a circle and Turtle’s back grew and grew until it became the Earth, as we know it, Turtle Island. And Little Turtle climbed into the sky and gathered the lightning into a great ball that became the sun and a smaller ball that became the moon and so there was light in the world.

Thirteen Moons

The Iroquois (traditionally Haudenosaunee) people see the cycle of life in all of our ceremonies and thanksgivings. Turtle’s shell is our calendar with its pattern of 13 large plates representing the thirteen moons in each year & 28 smaller plates showing the 28 days from one new moon to the next. We say that the Moon is our Grandmother and she has 13 names in the course of a year, they are:

The Mid-Winter Moon
The Maple Syrup or Split Days Moon
The Thunder Moon
The Planting Moon
The Strawberry Moon
The Green Bean Moon
The Green Corn Moon
The Harvest Moon
The Food Storing Moon
The Hunting Moon or Giving Thanks Moon
The Long Night Moon
The Great Light or Resting Moon
The Snow Moon

The Three Sisters

Among the Iroquois, it is believed that when the First Mother died, from her body grew the sacred plants: corn, beans and squash. They were planted together in small hills: the beans would twine around the corn stalks as they grew and the squash leaves would shade the earth and keep it moist and free of weeds. Protective spirits, the Sacred Sisters, sometimes glimpsed as they rustled among the corn or shook the stems of the squash or pumpkin, blessed the crops. The families of the Iroquois were protected by their clan spirits, among them, Wolf, Bear, Turtle, Hawk, Heron, Snipe, Eel, Deer and Beaver. All were nourished and sustained by the Three Sisters.

“the natural life teaches us to live in harmony with one another”

-traditional teachings of the Iroquois

Woodland Spirits

Woodland Spirits,
children of the Earth and Sky
sing of Peace
beneath the Great White Pine

                      -Dawn Dark Mountain

Dreams of Turtle Island

Iroquois tradition tells us that it was Great Turtle who offered his back as a place for Sky Woman, the first mother. The Sleeping Sun looks down upon the rising moon and the children of the Earth gather to give thanks and dream of Turtle Island.


“We thank you for the Sun and Moon and Stars,
for the Earth and the Waters,
and for all the children of the Earth and Sky.”

 -Dawn Dark Mountain

Song of the Oak

The moon waxes and wanes
as the acorn grows into the oak
as leaves bud, grow and fall again
and the dance of life continues…

-Dawn Dark Mountain

A Song for Kateri

Kateri Tekahkwi:tha, known as the Lily of the Mohawks, will be canonized in October 2012, becoming the first American Indian to achieve sainthood. Kateri lived from 1656 to 1680. When she died, it is said that her face, once disfigured by smallpox, became beautiful, her first miracle.  We honor her and reclaim her as a woman of the Iroquois nation, daughter of Algonquin and Mohawk parents and a manifestation of the sky world on earth. The sun-above-the-sky-awake, rises over her to re-awaken our people to our culture and traditions. The Mohawk clans, Bear, Turtle and Wolf watch over her. We burn the sacred tobacco for her spirit. A daughter of Turtle Island and Turtle clan, we wish her well on her path among the stars, on her journey to the next world.

We are the stars which sing.
We sing with our light;
We are the birds of fire,
We fly over the sky
Our light is a voice;
We make a road
For the spirit to pass over.

-Algonquian song of the stars

Homelands

Eagle is our messenger to the Creator and
Symbol of the Great Peace of the Iroquois Nation.
We honor him, he who flies the highest
Eagle remembers and always longs
for the Homelands,
Half-remembered, waiting in the past.

Beneath the Evergrowing Tree

The White Pine, symbol of the Great Peace between the Iroquois Nations, once dominated the Eastern Woodlands. Among its names are the World Tree, the Great Earth Tree, the Tree of Peace, the Celestial Tree and the Evergrowing Tree. It was thought to stand at the center of the world, bearing the sun and the moon aloft in its branches. Its great white roots were believed to penetrate down to the Great Turtle upon whose back the Earth rests.

Strawberry Moon (Awʌhihteˀ Wʌhní‧taleˀ)

The Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) people honor the cycle of life in all of our ceremonies and thanksgivings. We say that the Moon is our Grandmother and she has thirteen names in the course of a year.

The Long Night Moon (Wahsu‧tés Wʌhní‧taleˀ)

The Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) people honor the cycle of life in all of our ceremonies and thanksgivings. We say that the Moon is our Grandmother and she has thirteen names in the course of a year.

The twelfth moon of the year, the moon closest to the Winter Solstice (and the longest night), is the time for the people to gather and tell stories. The elders tell stories to refresh our memories, passing them on to the children and knowing that, through them, our oral traditions will continue. The spirits of Earth and Sky gather beneath the sleeping Sun and the Great White Pine of Peace.

We Give Thanks

From the East we give thanks
to our Mother, the Earth
and to the People, and those yet to be born,
and to the spirit of waters,
who make it possible for all things to live.
We give thanks to the fish, they sustain us.
and to the plants, they feed us and make us well,
and to the trees,
who give us shelter, shade and fruits.
and to the animal creatures,
who give us companionship and sustenance.
We give thanks to the birds, they sing sweet songs, 
& carry our messages to the Creator
From the North we give greetings & thanks to
the Four Winds, they refresh the air
& to the Grandfather Thunderers,
they bring the falling rains,
and to our Elder Brother Sun,
Every sunrise is a miracle of his light and warmth.
To the West, we give greetings and thanks
to Grandmother Moon,
and to the South, we give thanks to the Stars,
their sparkle guides us home.
To the East, we honor the four Sky Dwellers,
we thank all those who teach and guide us
We give greetings and thanks to the Creator
and for all that has been given us.
Now our minds are as one.

-traditional Iroquois thanksgiving prayer

Honor the Children of Earth & Sky

In Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) tradition, we honor all of the elements of life that the Creator has given us: the children of the Earth and Sky with wings and roots and feet, the Waters, the Earth, the Sun, the Moon, and the Stars. It is our responsibility, as the People, to care for all that Creation has provided.

Dance of the Turtles

It is said that it was little Turtle who climbed into the sky and gathered the lightning into a great ball, which became the sun, and a smaller ball that became the moon, and so there was light in the world.         

-Iroquois tradition

Evergreen

It was the slender trees with the needle-thin leaves that remembered their promise to the Creator and kept watch over all the living things through the long winters while the other trees slept. So they were promised that while the other trees lost their leaves every autumn, they would be honored and allowed to keep their green color, the color of life, through all the year.

Description

Choose any 5 cards for $20~available in packages of 5 cards and envelopes (Please specify image choices) Blank inside/stories on back.
Cards are 5 x 7 inches with the exception of “PEACE” (3.25 X 8 inches) and
“SANDHILL CRANE DANCE” (3.5 X 8.5 inches)
Cards are printed on Sundance felt cover stock and are sent in a clear protective bag
(Royal Sundance is Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified to come from responsibly managed forests, and made using 100% renewable energy sources and from recycled fibers from 30% to 100% post consumer waste)